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Mayor of Warsaw signs the LGBT+ Declaration

published: 2019-02-22 13:34, mlan
Mayor of Warsaw signs the LGBT+ Declaration fot. Mayor of Warsaw signs the LGBT+ Declaration

Everyone is equal before the law. No form of discrimination is allowed, and Warsaw should be open to everybody. Guided by the Constitution of the Republic of Poland, the country’s fundamental law, and the vision of the Capital City as a friendly and inclusive place, Mayor Rafał Trzaskowski signed the LGBT+ Declaration.


The document provides guidance in such areas as security, education, culture, sport, administration, and work.  “Warsaw is for everyone.  This is not just a political slogan, but the vision I have for my beloved City as one where there is a place for everyone. Political leaders, also at the local government level, need to take a determined stand against homophobia and discrimination to bring about a positive change in social behaviour. This equality is guaranteed by the Constitution of the Republic of Poland,” says Rafał Trzaskowski, Mayor of Warsaw.

 “-Local governments can change the social situation of LGBT+ persons by taking action to improve their safety, provide psychological support, and educate and inspire sympathy in society. What we have no control over is their legal situation, as this is something for the Polish Government to handle,” says Aldona Machnowska-Góra, Coordinating Director for Culture and Social Communication. “Warsovians of all sexes need to feel safe in our City, and their creativity and potential should not be limited, also when it comes to art. They should be respected and accepted regardless of their gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, or skin colour.”

Why is this Declaration important for the LGBT+ community in Warsaw?
● out of the nearly 2 million people who make up the community of Warsaw residents, up to 200,000 are members of LGBT+ groups,
● nearly 70 percent of LGBT people have experienced some form of violence over the last two years. For LGBT teenagers, the place where they experience aggression is usually school (26%), with their peers as the usual perpetrators (19%).